Eye Has Not Seen

Eye has not seen,

Ear has not heard,

Nor has it ever entered into the heart of man

the things which God has prepared for those who love him.

Some say nothing exists beyond the world seen with the eyes or experienced through the senses; that there is no life beyond what we daily experience. And, that life, in the end, is nothing more than chemical reactions in our biological matrix. There is no “heaven”, no “hell”, no after life, no resurrection, no God.

I do not fault those who believe this. I, however, do not find that explanation of things to be satisfying. There are hundreds or thousands of questions I can not answer. Questions that seem to confound the notion of a good and all loving God. Theodicy, as it is called, cannot be solved by human logic. I am not satisfied with that, but it is something I accept. This does not keep me from lying awake at night wondering why there is hunger in the world, or pain and suffering of innocents, or wars and famine and disease. I fail to understand how these things can be reconciled to an all loving, omnipotent God.

Yet, as strong an argument against the existence of God as that is, for me, there is a stronger more subtle and sublime reason I continue to believe. If there is a name for it, I don’t know what it is. It is the experience I have when I view a great work of art, or the wonder of a spectacular sunset, or grasp momentarily the indomitable spirit of some aged soul who has emerged from great suffering.

These are experiences that draw me out of myself to encounter the “other.” Beauty, aesthetics, wonder, awe. We all say certain things make us grateful or that we are thankful for this and that thing or experience. Whether it is purely *human* to say and feel such things and nothing more, I cannot say. But I feel, and I’d like to think, I intuit, that such feelings and aspirations are something more than biology. More than chemical reactions in my brain.

Religion as such is, and always has been, and in some sense, always will be, human and man made. There is no religion, per se, that is revealed as divine. Even in the Bible, in the Epistle of St James, it states, “Pure religion, and undefiled before God, is this: to visit the widows and orphans in their affliction and to keep oneself unspotted from the world.” Loving ones neighbor and living a good life. Elsewhere in the Bible, somewhere in the Old Testament, it says these words, “He has told thee, oh man, what is good and what the Lord requires of thee, to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God.”

“Be ye kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake, has forgiven you.”

In America today, as in much of the world, Christianity has little to do with Christ. Any casual observer can see that Christians lead the world in hate and fear mongering. There is nothing of God in this religion. Nothing at all. Yet Christianity is not dead. There are little fountains of hope where the Way of Christ is remembered and practiced. It is not in the grand palaces of the Prosperity Gospel, nor in the old stalwart Churches of the old guard, but here and there, almost invisible. The ugly, the lame, the blind, the sick, the poor, the outcasts, the disenfranchised, the lonely…the dregs of society; these are places where the Spirit is moving. Not in the whirlwind, not in the fire, not in the earthquake, but in the stillness with a small quiet voice, God is speaking.

In times of great spiritual famine, such as today, when the Word of God is so rare that it has been forgotten, God calls his people to come out of Babylon. A small drop of water at first, then a trickle, a stream, and then a mighty river. When every effort has been made to induce God from heaven to no avail, he speaks to those who will listen. He who has an ear, let him hear. It is not by might nor by power, but by my Spirit, says the Lord.

Christianity has sold it’s soul for a mess of pottage. It has exchanged the truth for a lie by courting political power and creating a god of its own imagination. It will die in the dust bin of history. Even now it is gasping for breath and grabbing at the air.

The end is near.

Christendom is dying and it is not a noble death, but an ignominious one. For more than 2000 years the Church has existed with saints and sinners in her pail. I wonder if she will survive this famine. We cannot hearken back to the past. Science has become the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. We know too much now. To go back would be hypocrisy and an unconscionable evil. Having eaten the fruit of that tree, we are bound to live with the results. The old must die and fade into the misty memories of an early childhood.

We have indeed begun to grow up as a race. We would be fools if we despised Science and all that it has taught us and the great promise that it holds for our future. We must embrace it and change ourselves. A Christianity that cannot or will not change and adapt, is already a dead, lifeless, corpse.

As for me, I will continue to be awed at the mystery of reality, at its beauty and tragedy. I will continue to believe in the ultimate victory of good over evil, of light over darkness, of life over death. I will continue to follow Jesus as best I can, to love my neighbor as myself and to do good in the world. I think ALL of us can agree on those last two parts, loving ones neighbor and doing good. It matters not what one believes if one does those things. This is all that is required for a better world. A better humanity.

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Loss and Gain

Someone recently asked on Facebook, “Why do some people beat others down to get ahead?”

People do this for two reasons: to get an emotional high and because it works. The survival of the fittest in its most animal expression.

These people are not endowed with, or at the least are suppressing, all that is noble and good that causes the human race to be somehow more than an animal.

To beat down others is to exploit weaknesses for self gain. It is also self destructive, in the end. What is left of such persons, when they have obtained the pinnacle to which they aspired, is little more than a shell of their former humanity. What does it profit to gain the whole world but lose ones own soul? A very apt question we should ask in these present days.

The Virtue of Honesty

The greatest virtue of all is love. By it the entire cosmos will be changed. Yet there is another virtue that is prerequisite to love, and in that sense, more essential. That virtue is honesty.

Where there is a dishonest heart, Love is at best a mere sentiment and at worst, hypocrisy.

It is essential to be honest both with our neighbors and especially ourselves. Honesty is not mere recitation of fact. That is what the Greeks called truth. Honesty is more subtle. We speak of brute honesty, but that is not always what the virtue of honesty requires.

Honesty is in covenant with love and they temper one another. To speak honestly is both to love truth and to love ones neighbor. Yet, in point of fact, ones neighbor is more important than simple facts. So when we speak, we must first consider our neighbor. What is best for them? How would we wish to be treated if our positions were reversed? The answer to that question is the honest and loving one. We should not speak to our neighbors harm if he is innocent. Nor should we shrink back from justice when it is needed. But in general dealings, we should temper our words with kindness.

Facts are not always kind. But facts are not the measure of honesty. Honesty has an eye to our neighbor’s good. When we speak ill of them with the intent of casting shadow on them, even if we speak only the facts, we are not being honest. Honesty requires that we speak the facts as they are truly in proper relationship to our neighbor. Any other use of facts constitutes dishonesty.

This is called speaking the truth in love; love being that overarching motivation to seek the good of others even to our own loss.

Suppose a man has lived a life of failure. Whether by his own fault or not, he has arrived at a place where he believes the world would be better without him. The pragmatist will look at this man’s life and be hard pressed to disagree with him. Surely, he will reason, this man has been a blight to society and the world would be better off without him in it. Is the pragmatist correct? Perhaps. But though he is factual, he is not honest. Honesty remembers that every one of us has different gifts, abilities, capabilities, capacity for learning, ability to reason, etc… Further, honesty remembers that an individual does not gain his worth from society, but is intrinsically dignified as a human being. Thus in no way can the honest man assent to the judgment of the pragmatist. That failure of a man can be reformed, or taught, and honesty acknowledges this.

Now, this is a mere example not intended to speak to every possible scenario. I simply wish to illustrate that brute facts do not constitute honesty.

Think before you speak. Speak the truth in love. Be honest with yourself and each other.

Rich in Poverty

The poor you will always have with you, but you will not always have me. – Matthew 26:11

We all know who the poor are. It's obvious. We see them every day. Many of us actually fit the bill for being poor.

This passage from Matthew's Gospel is a troubling one. The context is the story of Mary, sister of Martha and Lazarus, breaking open an expensive bottle of perfume and anointing Jesus' feet. The disciples grumbled saying, "This was expensive perfume. Why wasn't it sold and the money given to the poor?"

Jesus, though, saw things a bit differently. Mary was in poverty. She probably spent all she had to purchase the perfume so she could anoint Jesus' feet with it. In the kingdom of God, there is nothing more precious, more valuable, than the full self giving of oneself, in love, to God. Remember the time Jesus and his disciples were in the temple observing people giving their tithes? They saw both rich and poor giving money, but it was of the poor woman who gave all she had that Jesus said, "This woman has given more than anyone else. They gave out of their wealth, but she has given out of her poverty." The same principle applies here with Mary. Not only would it have been cruel to take the heart offered gift from Mary and give it to someone else, but it would be an insult to her poverty and sincerity in her self giving.

Jesus did not take what she did lightly. He was not glorifying in himself. Rather, he showed the utmost humility in receiving from a woman in poverty. He was not above her. He did not set himself as superior to her and her gift. He graciously received it.

The "poor" in the original quote are not merely those of financial poverty, but anyone who is in great need. Whether it be ignorance, addiction, entitlement, or whatever, these are people who are in deep and desperate need. We often think of them as victims of their own foolishness. And perhaps they are, but that does not eliminate their present situation.

As Christians, we are to condemn NO ONE. We are to love all. We are to pray for our enemies (and not in the sense of asking God to 'get them' or 'make them like us'), bless those who curse us and give sustenance to any who are in need of it.

The world is full of poverty of all sorts. We have not been called to eradicate it, as it will never happen, but we are called to love, to feed, to give.

The Truest Hope for Mankind

nativity-sceneThose who know me, know I take my faith very seriously.
Those who know me, know I try not to take life too seriously.
Those who know me, know I have a warped sense of humor.
Those who know me, know i am no prude or puritan.

On this Christmas night, 2015, what that means is I am again in wonder and awe that the Almighty God became human. I am not so confident in myself that I claim to comprehend what it means. My best guess is that the Incarnate God, Jesus Christ, revealed himself as human being, born in the most humble way possible, to demonstrate to us what “impresses” God. In a world full of “christians” who believe that there are a few lucky souls who will make it to heaven, with the hellish destination being the primary one for most of humanity, I find myself thinking they must be joking. God, who knows nothing but absolute bliss, perfect happiness and everlasting joy, all in Himself, with no need for anything or anyone else, THIS God, became a creature who poops, pees, eats, sleeps and does everything a creature does. He humbled himself in order to send a few us to heaven? LOL! If God is going to do a work, he does it to its fullest. He doesn’t cut corners. He never fails. He didn’t come to save a few, he came to save us all! He defeated hell and death! He holds the keys to them both! Keys are for opening locks. He opens the gates of hell and of the grave so that those who are in them can be freed.

Are you in hell? Are you dying? He holds your keys. Someday, in this life or the next, you will be freed. Freed to be all you ever dreamed and hoped for and so much more that you cannot begin to imagine it.

Jesus shows us the way. Follow him. There is no hell he cannot rescue you from. No death so thorough, you cannot be raised. Follow him. Imitate him. Do what he did. Live as he lived. Trust him.

Jesus Christ, the incarnate Word and Logos of God, the truest Hope for mankind.

The Opposite of Fear is…

The opposite of fear is not bravery. Bravery is acting heroically in spite of ones fear. No, the opposite of fear is love.
We live in a society that talks a lot about love; it seems to be everywhere. But, in reality, there are few who love. Those few are brave souls who make the most of what they have and shout their good news from the mountain tops. The rest of us follow their rhetoric but seem to never get anything really accomplished. Why, when love is in the air, is our society teetering on the brink of self destruction?
It is because, with the exception of those few, we live in fear. Not just superficial fear, but deep, profound fear. Fear of one another, of the future, of ourselves. We have deep uncertainties because of intellectual commitments that no longer ring true for us but which we cannot rid ourselves of without risking our social status, often within our own families.
Jesus Christ taught us to love one another. Holy Scripture tells us that “where there is fear, love has not yet been made perfect, for perfect love casts out fear.”
In order to save our society, it will take more than a few voicing their love over the media. It will take listening and doing on our part. Self giving is the truest fruit of love and we can all make a difference by putting others first and giving of ourselves, our time, and our resources to those who are less fortunate than we are.
We can be brave and give place to our doubts. Listen to those who’s ideas provoke you to deeper thoughts. Doubt can never be gotten rid of by suppressing or denying it. It can only be gotten rid of by answering the question that has been put to us. Moreover, a pat answer will not suffice. We must examine the question thoroughly and answer just as thoroughly. We must be willing to accept rejection by those who disagree; those who are not willing to step out of fear into love.
Let me make one thing clear, love is not emotion. Love is more than mere commitment, too. Love is determined, resolute, steadfast self-sacrifice. Love never fails. The emotions and the commitment to another come with love, but they are not it in themselves.
Do not do anything out of fear. If you cannot do something in love, then feel no obligation to do it at all until you can do it in love. This is the gateway to personal freedom. It can liberate you from all that binds you. When we act in fear, we are in bondage, but when we can act in love we are truly free. Endeavor to do everything out of of love. Never in fear.
Are you afraid of God? Are you motivated to obey him because of fear of hell or punishment? God will not condemn you for this kind of obedience, but it is not what pleases him most. He wishes you to be free, not in bondage to fear. Serve him in Love and you will be free to experience all that he has prepared for you in this life.
Above all, love one another. For Love is of God and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God. He that loves not, does not know God, for God is love. Beloved, let us love one another.

Being Good and Doing Good

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God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power: who went about doing good – Acts 10:38

5560077We spend much of our time attempting to be good people, at least those who are conscientious about their morality and ethics. As westerners, it has been warp and woof of our existence for centuries to place being good *prior* to doing good. We are fallen creatures, we are told. We cannot do good, it is said. Many of us have had it drilled into us that even if we try to be good, “all our righteousness are as filthy rags” in God’s sight.

Upon conversion to Christ, we are told the next step is to pursue holiness. This, we are told, is sanctification. Thousands upon thousands of books and other literature have been written on the topic; many of which attempt to assist the reader in their life long goal of becoming a good and holy person. The general gist of what sanctification is, according to the literature, is the transformation of the inner man to desire and will what God wishes for us. It is a difficult and often frustrating task, but one we cannot afford to avoid, if we are really in earnest about knowing God.

Millions of Christians have followed this path through the centuries and there is a rich spiritual tradition that has developed because of it. Various ascetic practices, some mild, some more severe, are often advocated as means to the desired end. After all, did not St Paul say we are to bring our bodies into submission? And is not the flesh the source, the effective cause for all of our sin? The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.

All of this is to say that Christians, in seeking sanctification, are an inward reaching people. Yet, how does that square with the life of Jesus, of whom it is said, he went about DOING good to other people? How can we do good if we are NOT good? Don’t we have to achieve or attain at least some measure of sanctification before we can start doing good?

Apparently not. Jesus gave no instructions for developing the inner life, but he did tell his followers to love one another. And, by his example, he did good to and for all. Jesus describes what he asks of us this way:

“My yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

How does that fit with the whole message of sanctification; that it’s a long difficult road? Jesus says it’s easy to follow him.

Here are my thoughts.

I believe it is quite wrong to pursue sanctification as has been traditionally done. The whole idea that we are an inward turned people is contrary to the gospel which specifically tells us to be outward reaching people, doing good and loving one another.

Doing good is easy. It simply means loving your neighbor as yourself. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. How hard is that?

Oh, yes, we often don’t WANT to do good to our neighbor. Well, in that case we are not in earnest about following Jesus. If that’s how you choose to live, fine, but don’t call yourself a Jesus follower, please.

We need not be good people to do the right thing. After all, as Jesus tells us, there is none good but God. We can do good quite easily enough if we want. The desire to do good and BE good together, counts as if it is already so.

We must remember that sanctification is the work of the Spirit, not our own work. We do not become good by turning inward to work on our “inner man”, but we become good by looking outward, first at Jesus and second at our neighbor to attend to his needs. As we go about doing good like Jesus did, the Holy Spirit works within us to change us. As we do good we become good; slowly but gradually.

As things are now, the West is infatuated with being good. Both liberals and conservatives operate on this principle. Of course, they have different interests and agendas, but the mechanics are the same. The net result is an inability to do good, to pursue the right, to see social justice met because we are unable to turn our attention away from ourselves and see the broken world around us and which needs our attention. We strive in vain to fix ourselves when it is our neighbor who needs our help and love.

We are so caught up in do’s and don’ts, so enmeshed in feeling right, or pursuing our personal goals that we cannot see the plain and simple issues of humanity that surround us. Fixing the world is easy, getting ourselves out of ourselves is not.

So, remember, the whole Law is summed up in these two commands: Love the Lord your God and your neighbor as yourself. Everything, literally, hangs on those two commands. Reach out side of yourself, help those around you who have needs. Do a little each day and at length you will find you have begun to experience that peace which passes all understanding. You will not be worried about heaven or hell. You will not fret about your neighbor who doesn’t see eye to eye with you. Everything will begin to fall into place. Sanctification will come through the work of the Spirit as YOU set out to go about doing good as Jesus did.