Eye Has Not Seen

Eye has not seen,

Ear has not heard,

Nor has it ever entered into the heart of man

the things which God has prepared for those who love him.

Some say nothing exists beyond the world seen with the eyes or experienced through the senses; that there is no life beyond what we daily experience. And, that life, in the end, is nothing more than chemical reactions in our biological matrix. There is no “heaven”, no “hell”, no after life, no resurrection, no God.

I do not fault those who believe this. I, however, do not find that explanation of things to be satisfying. There are hundreds or thousands of questions I can not answer. Questions that seem to confound the notion of a good and all loving God. Theodicy, as it is called, cannot be solved by human logic. I am not satisfied with that, but it is something I accept. This does not keep me from lying awake at night wondering why there is hunger in the world, or pain and suffering of innocents, or wars and famine and disease. I fail to understand how these things can be reconciled to an all loving, omnipotent God.

Yet, as strong an argument against the existence of God as that is, for me, there is a stronger more subtle and sublime reason I continue to believe. If there is a name for it, I don’t know what it is. It is the experience I have when I view a great work of art, or the wonder of a spectacular sunset, or grasp momentarily the indomitable spirit of some aged soul who has emerged from great suffering.

These are experiences that draw me out of myself to encounter the “other.” Beauty, aesthetics, wonder, awe. We all say certain things make us grateful or that we are thankful for this and that thing or experience. Whether it is purely *human* to say and feel such things and nothing more, I cannot say. But I feel, and I’d like to think, I intuit, that such feelings and aspirations are something more than biology. More than chemical reactions in my brain.

Religion as such is, and always has been, and in some sense, always will be, human and man made. There is no religion, per se, that is revealed as divine. Even in the Bible, in the Epistle of St James, it states, “Pure religion, and undefiled before God, is this: to visit the widows and orphans in their affliction and to keep oneself unspotted from the world.” Loving ones neighbor and living a good life. Elsewhere in the Bible, somewhere in the Old Testament, it says these words, “He has told thee, oh man, what is good and what the Lord requires of thee, to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with your God.”

“Be ye kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake, has forgiven you.”

In America today, as in much of the world, Christianity has little to do with Christ. Any casual observer can see that Christians lead the world in hate and fear mongering. There is nothing of God in this religion. Nothing at all. Yet Christianity is not dead. There are little fountains of hope where the Way of Christ is remembered and practiced. It is not in the grand palaces of the Prosperity Gospel, nor in the old stalwart Churches of the old guard, but here and there, almost invisible. The ugly, the lame, the blind, the sick, the poor, the outcasts, the disenfranchised, the lonely…the dregs of society; these are places where the Spirit is moving. Not in the whirlwind, not in the fire, not in the earthquake, but in the stillness with a small quiet voice, God is speaking.

In times of great spiritual famine, such as today, when the Word of God is so rare that it has been forgotten, God calls his people to come out of Babylon. A small drop of water at first, then a trickle, a stream, and then a mighty river. When every effort has been made to induce God from heaven to no avail, he speaks to those who will listen. He who has an ear, let him hear. It is not by might nor by power, but by my Spirit, says the Lord.

Christianity has sold it’s soul for a mess of pottage. It has exchanged the truth for a lie by courting political power and creating a god of its own imagination. It will die in the dust bin of history. Even now it is gasping for breath and grabbing at the air.

The end is near.

Christendom is dying and it is not a noble death, but an ignominious one. For more than 2000 years the Church has existed with saints and sinners in her pail. I wonder if she will survive this famine. We cannot hearken back to the past. Science has become the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. We know too much now. To go back would be hypocrisy and an unconscionable evil. Having eaten the fruit of that tree, we are bound to live with the results. The old must die and fade into the misty memories of an early childhood.

We have indeed begun to grow up as a race. We would be fools if we despised Science and all that it has taught us and the great promise that it holds for our future. We must embrace it and change ourselves. A Christianity that cannot or will not change and adapt, is already a dead, lifeless, corpse.

As for me, I will continue to be awed at the mystery of reality, at its beauty and tragedy. I will continue to believe in the ultimate victory of good over evil, of light over darkness, of life over death. I will continue to follow Jesus as best I can, to love my neighbor as myself and to do good in the world. I think ALL of us can agree on those last two parts, loving ones neighbor and doing good. It matters not what one believes if one does those things. This is all that is required for a better world. A better humanity.

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Being Good and Doing Good

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God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Ghost and with power: who went about doing good – Acts 10:38

5560077We spend much of our time attempting to be good people, at least those who are conscientious about their morality and ethics. As westerners, it has been warp and woof of our existence for centuries to place being good *prior* to doing good. We are fallen creatures, we are told. We cannot do good, it is said. Many of us have had it drilled into us that even if we try to be good, “all our righteousness are as filthy rags” in God’s sight.

Upon conversion to Christ, we are told the next step is to pursue holiness. This, we are told, is sanctification. Thousands upon thousands of books and other literature have been written on the topic; many of which attempt to assist the reader in their life long goal of becoming a good and holy person. The general gist of what sanctification is, according to the literature, is the transformation of the inner man to desire and will what God wishes for us. It is a difficult and often frustrating task, but one we cannot afford to avoid, if we are really in earnest about knowing God.

Millions of Christians have followed this path through the centuries and there is a rich spiritual tradition that has developed because of it. Various ascetic practices, some mild, some more severe, are often advocated as means to the desired end. After all, did not St Paul say we are to bring our bodies into submission? And is not the flesh the source, the effective cause for all of our sin? The spirit is willing but the flesh is weak.

All of this is to say that Christians, in seeking sanctification, are an inward reaching people. Yet, how does that square with the life of Jesus, of whom it is said, he went about DOING good to other people? How can we do good if we are NOT good? Don’t we have to achieve or attain at least some measure of sanctification before we can start doing good?

Apparently not. Jesus gave no instructions for developing the inner life, but he did tell his followers to love one another. And, by his example, he did good to and for all. Jesus describes what he asks of us this way:

“My yoke is easy and my burden is light.”

How does that fit with the whole message of sanctification; that it’s a long difficult road? Jesus says it’s easy to follow him.

Here are my thoughts.

I believe it is quite wrong to pursue sanctification as has been traditionally done. The whole idea that we are an inward turned people is contrary to the gospel which specifically tells us to be outward reaching people, doing good and loving one another.

Doing good is easy. It simply means loving your neighbor as yourself. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. How hard is that?

Oh, yes, we often don’t WANT to do good to our neighbor. Well, in that case we are not in earnest about following Jesus. If that’s how you choose to live, fine, but don’t call yourself a Jesus follower, please.

We need not be good people to do the right thing. After all, as Jesus tells us, there is none good but God. We can do good quite easily enough if we want. The desire to do good and BE good together, counts as if it is already so.

We must remember that sanctification is the work of the Spirit, not our own work. We do not become good by turning inward to work on our “inner man”, but we become good by looking outward, first at Jesus and second at our neighbor to attend to his needs. As we go about doing good like Jesus did, the Holy Spirit works within us to change us. As we do good we become good; slowly but gradually.

As things are now, the West is infatuated with being good. Both liberals and conservatives operate on this principle. Of course, they have different interests and agendas, but the mechanics are the same. The net result is an inability to do good, to pursue the right, to see social justice met because we are unable to turn our attention away from ourselves and see the broken world around us and which needs our attention. We strive in vain to fix ourselves when it is our neighbor who needs our help and love.

We are so caught up in do’s and don’ts, so enmeshed in feeling right, or pursuing our personal goals that we cannot see the plain and simple issues of humanity that surround us. Fixing the world is easy, getting ourselves out of ourselves is not.

So, remember, the whole Law is summed up in these two commands: Love the Lord your God and your neighbor as yourself. Everything, literally, hangs on those two commands. Reach out side of yourself, help those around you who have needs. Do a little each day and at length you will find you have begun to experience that peace which passes all understanding. You will not be worried about heaven or hell. You will not fret about your neighbor who doesn’t see eye to eye with you. Everything will begin to fall into place. Sanctification will come through the work of the Spirit as YOU set out to go about doing good as Jesus did.